Journal of Spectral Imaging,   Volume 8   Article ID a12   (2019)

Peer reviewed Paper

Matrix-assisted ionisation in vacuum mass spectrometry and imaging on a modified quadrupole-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer

  • Alex James Harding
  • James Hough
  • Charlotte Curtis
  • Daniel Kinsman
  • Malcolm R. Clench
Centre for Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK

 Search for papers by this author
Centre for Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK

 Search for papers by this author
Centre for Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK

 Search for papers by this author
Centre for Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK

 Search for papers by this author
 Corresponding Author
Centre for Mass Spectrometry Imaging, Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK
[email protected]
 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0798-831X
 Search for papers by this author

Matrix-Assisted Ionisation in Vacuum (MAIV) is a new ionisation technique which ionises non-volatile compounds producing electrospray ionisation-like spectra. Its simple, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-like sample preparation allows for rapid analysis, with no requirement for external energy in the form of a laser or high voltage to produce ions. Ionisation occurs when the matrix (often 3-nitrobenzonitrile) is exposed to sub-ambient pressure. Here, the first use of this revolutionary new ionisation technique to image biological samples is reported. A commercial quadrupole-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer was modified to incorporate control of the ion source pressure and a reduced sampling cone orifice diameter. In initial experiments, optimisation of source pressure and matrix composition was carried out to increase the longevity of ion formation. It was noted during these experiments that ion production was only observed when the sample was directly under the sampling cone. Optimisation of sample extraction into the MAIV matrix by the addition of 5 % chloroform enabled MAIV mass spectrometry imaging of lipids in rat brain sections to be carried out in raster imaging mode. Modification of the size and position of the sampling cone improved the selectivity obtainable in these images. Although the quality of these initial images is relatively poor, work is underway to improve the spatial resolution by further modification of the ion source and progress is reported.

Metrics

Downloads:

222

Full-Text HTML Views:

1

Abstract Views:

1,306